The Underground| Solange Knowles “Losing You”

by Sabla of GoldenSense

Ms. Mydamnblog herself, Solange Knowles is back with the music in 2012 with the premiere of her single Losing You. If you haven’t seen the video check it it out below. Solange has been very present yet low key these past few years and with those years blossomed this beautiful woman that came into her own, who isn’t afraid to present herself for who she is. If you compare her music video Losing You to her past projects there is a distinct visual difference. You can see that this music video and song had all of Solange’s creativity written all over it. One of the last songs I remember from Solange is her controversial big F YOU song to the music industry which till this day I commend her on. Shes someone who isn’t afraid of telling it how it is and that’s something I’ve personally always admired about her. Losing You isn’t of the same nature of her song ”F*ck The Industry (Signed Sincerely)" but her release of this track has this "Look at me, Im doing what I want to do and people like it." Staying true to yourself is what will separate you from the rest and Solange is a prime example of that. Check out more at www.sablagoldensense.blogspot.com

Directed By: MELINA MATSOUKAS
Song Produced By: DEVONTÉ HYNES

What are your opinions on Solange’s new Single Losing You?

Five hours ago Solange released the video for her new single, “Losing You.” Losing You was co-written and produced by Dev Hynes (Blood Orange).  The video was directed by Melina Mastsoukas and filmed in Cape Town, South Africa. It features Congo natives Les Sapeurs as well as Solange’s close friends.

Here’s what Solange said about the experience of shooting the video:

"When Melina and I decided to film ‘Losing You’ in South Africa, we really didn’t have a real firm concept in place. It was sort of a grab a camera and let’s go moment. I knew I wanted to capture a couple things: the vibe of our friendship and all of the crazy escapades we’ve gotten ourselves into all over the world, and the abstract and elegant Le Sape Society (Society for the Advancement of People of Elegance) formed in the Congo which was documented by Daniele Tamagni in his Gentleman of Bacongo book.  We called Daniele to guide us, and some of my friends from New York came down to Cape Town and we all had a very damn good time.

Purchase the single on iTunes: http://bit.ly/W9iOd8

Solange Lurve Magzine October 2012

Photography Ellen Von Unwerth | Styling Lyna V Ahanda | Hair David Wadlow | Make Up Laure Dansou

On her sense of humor and fashion risks
That sense of humor is really just the key to keeping my sanity, not taking myself  or others too seriously. I’m the first one to make fun of myself because, quite frankly, I do some dumb sh-t all of the time.  I don’t get embarrassed too easily, either. That’s a trait that has served me well, and made a fool of me sometimes.

I mean, look at some of my fashion choices back in the day.  You know how people say, ‘Who let her walk out of the house that way?” or “She needs more people!”… Oh believe me, I had the people, and they tried, but I resisted the arrest! Life is suppose to be about experimenting and going for it, especially in your twenties. So I have to just go for it, and laugh later.

On so much attention being focused on her Hair
I’m actually really trying to navigate my feelings on the entire hair issue and it’s tough doing that publicly.  On one hand, I can’t ignore the fact that I have done things that have put attention on my hair with going on Oprah and being apart of Carol’s Daughter.

I was asked to go on Oprah on an episode that was dedicated to Black Hair, and to speak about why I cut my hair. I honestly thought, “Number one, it’s Oprah, and who wouldn’t want to go on Oprah and meet her?!?!  She’s amazing! But also, I thought if I addressed it then, then maybe I wouldn’t have to on that level again.

I spoke about how I felt like my hair was holding me back in some ways from fully utilizing my life, in terms of the time, energy and money I was spending. I also remember very clearly saying that this was the phase I am in at the time and that if I wanted to wear a weave down to my calves–when and if that time came–I very much so would. I still feel that way now. I realize for some people that this was a big turning point in terms of how they saw me.

I’m actually no longer a part of Carol’s Daughter, but throughout my entire time working with them, I was constantly fighting for the right message to be heard. The message that, the way we wear our hair is a personal choice, there’s no right or wrong way; one way doesn’t make us more intelligent, or more superficial, and every one makes that choice for very different reasons.

Read more: Necole Bitchie.com